BITTER DEFEAT

School_Seven_Bells44 on Flickr.Stunned to hear about Benjamin Curtis passing away at only 35. I had the privilege of seeing School of Seven Bells a few times; here he is at Mercury Lounge in 2008.

School_Seven_Bells44 on Flickr.

Stunned to hear about Benjamin Curtis passing away at only 35. I had the privilege of seeing School of Seven Bells a few times; here he is at Mercury Lounge in 2008.

natgeofound:

Three adolescent Jewish boys, their heads traditionally covered with skullcaps or top hats, sitting in front of school lockers in Brooklyn, June 1982.Photograph by Robert Madden, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Three adolescent Jewish boys, their heads traditionally covered with skullcaps or top hats, sitting in front of school lockers in Brooklyn, June 1982.Photograph by Robert Madden, National Geographic

Twelve Jargon and Grammar Trends that Need to Go Away in 2014

1. Empty sentence adverbs (arguably/actually/essentially/just)
Intended to convey degree, amount, or severity, these adverbs usually end up conveying nothing. Remove them from phrases like “I just wanted to say…,” or, “I’m actually glad you said that,” and you get shorter phrases that mean the same thing. “Arguably” still has some value if you are attempting to specify one of a range of possibilities, but people increasingly use it to indicate that they are, in fact, making an argument, which is redundant. “Kara Walker is arguably one of the most important women artists….” If that is your argument, state it simply and provide evidence. Full disclosure: Actually, this is arguably the irritating tendency of which I am most guilty.
2. Multidisciplinary/interdisciplinary
This one is specific to my line of work, but its use as an unnecessary and aggrandizing descriptor is rampant in art and culture circles. If you work in more than one medium or area, congratulations, you are now a “multidisciplinary” artist or theorist, like approximately 99% of your peers.
3. Engage with/engagement
This is the new way to “see,” “do,” or “experience” something. You don’t look at art, you “engage with” it. We don’t talk to students, we “engage with” them or encourage their “engagement.”
4. Nouns as verbs (to message, to impact) [related: “-ify”]
“How can we most effectively message this?” Barf. Marketing types have made the use of nouns as verbs into an insidious cottage industry. At least some have the “decency” to tack “-ify” onto the end of a noun in order to give it that all-important sense of dynamic action. Why build a narrative around something when you can just “storify” the damn thing?
5. “Because…noun/verb/adj.”
My feelings on this are a matter of social-media record, so I won’t belabor the point. Suffice it to say that some, notably Childish Gambino, still think this is funny. Let’s agree to disagree.
6. “Selfie” and “twerk”
These are ugly little words made all the more horrible by the pathetic, decadent behaviors to which they refer. This is the sound of dignity scratching at the lid of its coffin.
7. Content (n.)
“Content” is one of those ubiquitous buzz-words that can refer to anything, and therefore signify zilch. “We need to post more end-of-year grammar lists” is such a mouthful. Instead, try issuing a vague demand for “more content.”
8. Experiential
In education, this used to be called “learning by doing” or “learning from experience.” Now it is called “experiential learning,” for no good reason. In marketing, what used to be called “throwing parties where a cool thing happens” is now called “developing experientials.” Because, like, you really experience something.
9. Artisanal
To clarify, I am not targeting the use of “artisanal” by craftspeople or marketers who are attempting to convey that their products are, in most cases, made on a small scale using natural or traditional ingredients and processes. No, we’ve moved well beyond that. My beef here is with the now-rampant use of “artisanal” as the laziest chunk of cultural-stereotype shorthand since “hipster.” Want to take a hilarious jab at Park Slope, Brooklyn? No problem! Just put the word “artisanal” in front of any noun, and you are the proud parent of trenchant satire.
10. Activate/activation
“To make happen,” as in, “We have moved from the planning stage to activation,” or, “We need to activate this audience-engagement initiative.”
11. Immersive
An “immersive” experience involves more than one thing happening at a given time. One good example of an immersive experience is literally anything that has ever happened to anyone who possesses two or more human senses.
12. Move the needle
When you move the needle, some positive result, however incremental, has been achieved. This is now a thing because “not fucking up monumentally” is the new “success.” “Let’s move to the activation stage on that immersive experiential you’ve been messaging, and we’ll see if it moves the needle at all.”

moma:

Young, Loud, and Snotty—Punk Posters in the Collection

Check out some of the punk and post-punk posters, album sleeves, and flyers from the 1970s and 1980s in our collection! 


[Unknown designer. Joy Division, An Ideal for Living. 1978; Unknown designer. Joy Division, Here Are the Young Men. 1982; Malcolm Garrett, collage by Linder (Linder Sterling). Buzzcocks, Orgasm Addict. Poster for single distributed by United Artist Records, London. 1977; Linder (Linder Sterling). Buzzcocks, Beating Hearts. Poster for Beating Hearts tour. c. 1979; Unknown designer. Lou Reed, Rock N Roll Animal. 1974; Unknown designer. Lou Reed, First Solo LP. 1972; Exquisite Design. Ramones, Leave Home. 1977; John Holmstrom and Spencer Drate. Ramones, Road to Ruin. 1978; Unknown designer. The Cramps, A Date with Elvis. Poster for album distributed by Big Beat Records, London. 1986; X3 Studios. The Cramps, Illegal Records. 1979]